Mr. Madison’s War

The War of 1812 was, in many respects, something of a disaster. Throughout the United States there was a general resentment and frustration over issues of trade that had been improperly settled after the Revolution, and many areas were openly looking for an excuse to go to war with the British again. There was a distinct geographical split seen both in Congress and public opinion. The southern and western sections were largely in favour, seeing it as an excuse to expand westward and gain international respect. Continue reading

The San Patricio Project: or How to Do More Work Than Necessary In Order To Avoid Writing Yet Another Paper

Background:
The most controversial aspect of the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) was likely the San Patricio Battalion. While they continue to be lauded as national heroes in Mexico, the US government refused to admit their existence until roughly 1915 and the Irish-American community has considered them an awkward and potentially threatening association. It is little wonder– the core of San Patricio Battalion was formed in 1846, consisting almost entirely of deserters from the US Army.
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A Brief History of Intersectional Feminism and Other 19th Century Reform Movements

When women’s liberation arises, it does so as a companion to industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of the nuclear family, all aspects present in the United States in the period after the War of 1812. It is a response to the increasing requirement that women act as autonomous individuals, while remaining legally and socially dependent on and subordinate to men in accordance with the traditional culture.1 However it cannot simply happen automatically; it requires a precedent. Continue reading