The Rise of The New England Working Girl, as Described by Thomas Dublin

Chart of occupations of wage-earning Massachusetts women in 1837 (taken from page 20 of Transforming Women’s Work by Thomas Dublin)

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The San Patricio Project: or How to Do More Work Than Necessary In Order To Avoid Writing Yet Another Paper

Background:
The most controversial aspect of the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) was likely the San Patricio Battalion. While they continue to be lauded as national heroes in Mexico, the US government refused to admit their existence until roughly 1915 and the Irish-American community has considered them an awkward and potentially threatening association. It is little wonder– the core of San Patricio Battalion was formed in 1846, consisting almost entirely of deserters from the US Army.
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Founding The Peculiar Institution– Race and Labour in Early America

Many groups came to the New World, for many different reasons. They found different climates in different areas, which created different social structures. The fertile soil and warm climate in the south created a need for large numbers of unskilled labourers, which led to the development of race-based slavery, a situation which has lasting effects on the United States even today. The cooler climate and rocky soil in the north created a society that depended more on industry, commerce, and wage labour. This division between societies would become more and more jarring in the aftermath of the American Revolution, and eventually lead to the Civil War. Continue reading

The English Move West, Why, and What They Did There

(Note: This was written before I had a good grasp of how to document my sources, and thus is not up to proper academic standards. It does, however, give a good grasp of the settlement patterns and demographic issues of the early colonial period in what would become the United States.)

The European motives for colonization in the New World had a great deal to do with Europe, and little to do with the New World. Settlers sought economic opportunity and religious freedom, which were in short supply in Europe. Their inevitable collision with the people already living in the New World would set the stage for the next five centuries of human history. Continue reading